Lakeside Church

Luke

A series all about Jesus

Current Scripture Reading

Luke 6:1-11

Note: The audio version contains the full chapter, not just this week’s passage.

Most Recent Message

July 25, 2021 | Luke 5:33-39

Why do we fast? Why do we pray? Why do we do any of the things we do when it comes to following Jesus? Are we following Him blindly, just going through the motions of religious tradition because someone – a pastor, a parent, someone in the church – told us that’s how it’s done? In this message, Pastor Marc Gagnon leads us through a section of Luke 5 as Jesus calls out the religious people of the day for following rules and traditions without thoughtful reflection. This unexpected response takes us deeper into scripture as we examine what it means for us as we follow Jesus today!

Discussion Questions

For small Groups, families, or for individual reflection

These questions are connected to the message, “Introducing Jesus” from April 11, 2021. You can find it here.

  1. Read the passage from two or three different translations. Are they much different? 
  2. What word, phrase, or idea grabbed you either from the passage or the sermon this week?
  3. Do you feel that you have “investigated” the beliefs that have been handed down or taught to you, or have you received them unexamined? 
  4. Does the idea of investigating truth or faith intimidate you? Why or why not?
  5. Have you experienced a time when you came into new understandings of your faith or scripture? How was that for you? 
  6. Have you ever considered that you are an eyewitness to the work of Jesus now, in your life, in the lives of others, and in the world? 
  7. In what ways have you experienced or encountered Jesus? Have you shared that with anyone? Why or why not? 

These questions are connected to the message, “What have you given up on?” from April 18, 2021. You can find it here.

  1. Read or listen to this passage (Luke 1:5-25) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before or you felt was speaking to you or that you’re challenged by?
  2. Have you found yourself in a position where the physical realities of life around you are so daunting that you forget the supernatural power of God? What can you dare to trust God for and pray into? Can you invite your group to stand with you in prayer and expectation? 
  3. Have you ever felt like you had a “constructive time-out” — a time where God was asking you to wait? To listen? What was it like? What did you learn?
  4. What have you given up on — a situation, relationship, dream? Is it a giving up out of despair or because God has called you to something else? 
  5. Have you ever been so full of church and yet empty of God? Have you found yourself so full of scripture knowledge and yet empty of encounter? If so, what ways have you found in the past that helped you encounter God (worship music, scripture, walks in nature, silent journaling)? Is it time to engage those practices again and actively seek the presence of God? 
  6. Have you ever experienced a prophetic experience like Marc shared about his calling to Lakeside or something similar? Can you share that with the group? Do you sense that perhaps you might have that spiritual gifting? 

These questions are connected to the message, “What to do when life throws you a curveball” from April 25, 2021. You can find it here.

  1. Read the passage (Luke 1:26-38) in an unfamiliar translation. What word, phrase, thought stands out to you. Why
  2. Was there a time in your life when your “preferred future” (your plans and dreams) were interrupted or dashed completely? What was that like? How did you experience God during that time (did God seem closer or more distant)? Share with the group if you’re comfortable).
  3. What is your default for handling/reacting to situations that blindside you, over which you have no control?
  4. This pandemic was unforeseen and beyond our control. Do you feel it has been a time of growth for you? Has it exposed blind spots? How has it challenged you in your faith and following of Jesus?
  5. Unlike Mary, most of our life’s curveballs aren’t direct mandates from God; they’re often the result of our own missteps, others’ missteps, or the consequences of living in a broken world. What does a faithful response look like in those situations?
  6. What might faithfulness look like for you in this season of your life? Are there areas that you feel prompted to release control over to God or to at least pray for the desire to be able to do this?
  7. What is one area of your life that you could focus on trying to be more faithful in the next few weeks? Share with your group if you’re comfortable. Do you have to see results for faithfulness to be “successful?”

These questions are connected to the message, “What is just about justice?” from May 2, 2021. You can find it here.

Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (specifically Luke 1:41-55) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before or you felt was speaking to you or challenged you?
 
Reflect:
  1. What stood out to you in the sermon? (What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you?) 
  2. How would you define or explain justice? In what ways do you think God’s justice differs from our own understanding? 
  3. Where does “punishment” fit in (or does it)? 
  4. When you think of “salvation,” what do you normally think of? Have you thought of Salvation and the Kingdom of God in terms of our current social realities, of clean water, enough food for everyone, the end of war and poverty? Why or why not? 
  5. How might considering “salvation” in this way impact how you view the gospel and the kingdom of God? 
  6. Mary declared a new Lord even though He was still in utero. In what areas do you/we need to re-evaluate our allegiance? 
  7. “It’s God’s plan therefore the method and the means must be God’s.” In what ways have you witnessed Christians or the Church (historically or currently) using the means of the world to gain and sustain influence and control? 
Geek Out: Mary references God’s promise to Abraham in Genesis 17:3-8. What is missing from Mary’s declaration that was included in the Abrahamic promise? (Hint: verse 8) Why do you suppose that is? 
 
Take Action:
Of these 5 prayers, which one might you focus on this week?  
GOD: 
  1. Where are you bigger and more outside of my/our way of thinking and interpreting the world than we are currently able to see? 
  2. What am I or we missing? What don’t we want to see?
  3. Do I prefer the security & safety of the status quo or am I willing to follow hard after faithfulness? 
  4. Am I/are we afraid of anything? If so, what and why? 
  5. God, Help me/help us to see and to imagine the impossible possibilities, God-possibilities, to welcome surprises, to expect them.
These questions are connected to the message, “Nothing good comes from ……………….!” from May 9, 2021. You can find it here.
 
Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 2:1-20) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before, or you felt was speaking to you or that you’re challenged by?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, or motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. The census was an unwelcome intrusion into the lives of Mary and Joseph and the Jews of this time. Yet God used it for his purposes to fulfill an age old prophecy. Was there a time in your life when you saw God take an unwelcome, unexpected intrusion or turn of events and use it for good … redeemed it? 
  3. Bethlehem means House of Bread. Discuss the significance of this. 
  4. Luke 2:10-11 says, But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Saviour has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. What is the good news? How would you explain it to someone who asked? 
  5. God-among-us was placed in a feeding trough — the Holy amidst the ordinary, the profane. What are the implications of this for our daily lives? How might this awareness affect how we see the world, how we work, how we engage with people? 
  6. Luke 2:14 says, “Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favour rests.” The Roman Empire was an empire at peace. That peace was achieved through the pax Romana — peace born of violence, fear, and intimidation. Contrast the peace of God/peace of the Kingdom and the peace of empire. Do you think the Church today embodies the peace of God? Why or why not? How different is our worldview than that of empire? 
Geek out:

The Gospel writers didn’t record the life of Jesus like a security camera would — every event recorded in chronological order. They wrote theologically — that is, they wove the story together to make certain points and sometimes veiled allusions. Luke writes (hyperbolically) “that all the world should be registered.” Census and taxation were local affairs and conducted by local government and certainly would not have impacted “all the world.” What point or contrast might Luke be trying to make by including this phrase in the birth story of Jesus? 

Hidden Treasure:

Bethlehem was one of the towns where the lambs for sacrifice were raised. Jerusalem was  where they were slaughtered — offered for sacrifice in the temple. Jesus’ life begins in Bethlehem and ends in Jerusalem. 

Act on it:
  1. Look for God in the ordinary. Look for beauty where you might least expect it. Choose to see the image of God in someone you struggle with. 
  2. Examine your worldview. Do you find yourself considering political clout and war to “fix” world issues? 
These questions are connected to the message, “Do You Want More Wisdom in Your Life?” from May 16, 2021. You can find it here.
 
Dive In: 
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 2:21-52) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before, you felt was speaking to you, or that you’re challenged by?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, or motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Daniel mentioned the “crossover of influence” (like the intersection of two lines) where what used to be a primary influencer is replaced or superseded by another influencer. For Jesus followers it is the allegiance of Jesus that takes over as the primary influencer over the world. As you look back over your life are you able to see that crossover take place? Was it a moment, event, or multiple moments — more like a wiggly line than a point in time? Do you find that you have to be vigilant — can you feel yourself being sucked into the world’s loyalties and allegiances, ideologies and priorities? 
  3. Luke 2: 40, 52 both indicate that Jesus grew in wisdom. Have you considered before that God in the flesh, would have to acquire or grow into wisdom? How does this impact your understanding of the incarnation and of Jesus as Messiah? 

Communion:

  1. Have you traditionally thought of Communion as simply an act of remembrance with no real implications, or as a ritual through which Christ acts on the individual — something that can change you? Discuss.
  2. Jesus chose the ordinary (bread) and the impure (blood symbolized by wine) and made them holy, ritualized them as the cornerstone of our worship. Explore the implications of this.   
Geek out:
  1. One New Testament scholar has said that the four gospels are actually just passion narratives (crucifixion/resurrection) with long introductions. What are some clues throughout verses 22-52 that hint at the crucifixion or end of the story? 
Act on it:

The imagery of us being “the body of Christ” is much more than imagery. It is a reality. Read/pray this prayer of Teresa of Avila (16th century):                             

Christ has no body now, but yours.
No hands, no feet on earth, but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which
Christ looks compassion into the world.
Yours are the feet
with which Christ walks to do good.
Yours are the hands
with which Christ blesses the world.
These questions are connected to the message, “I’ve Been Baptized so I’m Good to Go, Right?” from May 23, 2021. You can find it here.
 
Dive In: 
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 3:1-20) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before or you felt was speaking to you or that you’re challenged by?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. How have you/do you generally understand “repentance?” Is it / has it been a feeling sorry for your missteps or a complete 180 — a changing of your mind, a reorienting of your whole life, views, priorities? Discuss.
  3. In v. 8 John calls them out for relying on “Abraham as their father.” That’s ‘bible speak’ for saying “we’re circumcised, we’re part of God’s chosen people.” What are some of the ways that we may be lulled into complacency — the practices that we might even subconsciously think make us ‘ok’ when in fact we might be missing the plot?
  4. What does John (and later Jesus) emphasize as the ‘fruit’ of a changed/transformed life? Can you name the areas in our lives where the Kingdom of God / the Jesus Way pushes against and challenges our comfort, complacency, default thinking/living, sense of moral uprightness?
  5. Does the idea of refining fire for our transformation frighten or thrill you? Why do you think God is so committed to our transformation? 
Geek Out:
  1. John calls out the crowd (ordinary people who probably think they’re pretty good), the tax collectors (the lowest of the low — extortionists & traitors), and soldiers (though they may likely have been Jews they are carrying the sword for Rome and therefore, the enemy). What is Luke saying by highlighting each of these groups?  
  2. Notice that it is in the “wilderness” (v.2) that the word of God (Greek rhema = utterance, saying) comes to John. The wilderness is a common theme throughout Scripture: it was in the wilderness where God met the Israelites/Hebrews in a pillar of fire and pillar of cloud, and in the tabernacle. It was where God formed a new nation/people. The exile to Babylon (where the Hebrews learned that God was with them even in a foreign country) was considered wilderness. It was a place of trial and preparation and transformation. The Israelites, John, then Jesus’ 40 days of temptation in the wilderness — what is the theological significance? What is being communicated through the theme of wilderness?
Hidden Treasure:
  1. Notice the contrast between the list of political and religious figures mentioned in 3:1 — many voices — in palaces and temples, to that of John — one voice calling out in the desolate wilderness. God seems to prefer to meet us in the desolate regions of our lives, in the least expected of people, places, and circumstances (John must have been a sight with his long hair and beard, sackcloth tunic, eating locusts and honey!).
  2. Notice also, Luke’s instructions when asked “What should we do?” in vv. 13-14. They are not heroic recommendations but simply doing your job with integrity. That is a great starting point to following in the way of Jesus. 
Act on it:
  1. If you asked, “What should I do?” what might God say to you? 
  2. Maybe you’d like to be baptized if you haven’t already been; to say “YES I want to be united with Christ in his death, burial, and resurrection. I want new life!” Do let us know. 🙂  
These questions are connected to the message, “Is God Actually Good?” from May 30, 2021. You can find it here
 
Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 3:21-28) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). Ask: God, what are you revealing about yourself in this story that you want me to hear?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Have you ever seriously and legitimately wondered if God is good … all the time? (This isn’t a trick question; it’s an existential and essential question)**
  3. Why do you suppose that Jesus submitted to a ‘baptism of repentance’ when he had nothing from which to repent? What was the message he was declaring? 
  4. If God’s presence can’t be contained in a building, location, or ritual, what are the implications of that for you? 
  5. Have you ever wondered whether, if you’d been there, you would have followed Jesus — the boy next door, the carpenter’s son, the homeless street preacher?
Geek Out:
  1. If the dove represents the Holy Spirit, what is significant about this event in light of the Trinity (Father, Son, Holy Spirit)? (Hint: first time …)
  2. In Matthew’s genealogy he begins typically with the last ancestor and moves to the present. Luke begins in the present and doesn’t just go back to Abraham, the ‘Father’ of the Jewish people, as Matthew does, but to Adam. What is the significance of this? What theological point is Luke trying to make? (Bear in mind that the story is going somewhere, toward the cross)
Hidden Treasures:
  1. Many scholars note that Jesus’ baptism was a symbolic hinge point between the Old Testament and the New Testament — John the Baptist represents the last of the OT prophets and the dove represents something new is happening. 
  2. Note the continuity of symbolism: in the story of Noah, the dove was sent out of the ark to test to see if it was safe to disembark and it came back with an olive branch — a sign of new life. Redemption was underway, and new life was beginning. 
  3. Luke’s gospel is the only one that notes Jesus praying at his baptism. Prayer will be a theme throughout Luke. If you’re keeping a Luke journal or notes on Luke, note every reference to Jesus praying as we go. We see Jesus praying at the beginning of his ministry and at the end — from the cross. 
Act on it:
As you go through the week, pay attention to how your image / understanding of God impacts how you see life, how you pray, how you feel about yourself, how you react to others. Does your image of God need to be more aligned to Jesus? To the symbolism of a dove? ** One author has said the most important question for us is “Who is God?” When we get the who right we get everything right. When we get the who wrong we get everything wrong.” 
~ Steve Bell, musician, author
These questions are connected to the message “Chatting with the Devil” from Sunday, June 6, 2021. You can find it here.
 
Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 4:1-13) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who God is and what God is like?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Luke tells us that Jesus is full of the Holy Spirit. This is how he will carry out his entire ministry. As followers of Jesus we too have the Holy Spirit within us. How does this make you feel? How does this challenge you? Encourage you? 
  3. Jesus spends an excruciating 40 days in the desert with no food, no water, no fellowship. He is alone with himself, with God, and with the Tempter (devil). Yet in verse 14 Luke tells us that Jesus emerges from this experience “in the power of the Holy Spirit.” Has there been a time in your life when you have been in a ‘desert’ or dark place and God met you in a powerful way — you encountered God and grew in your faith? 
  4. Marc said that “something doesn’t need to be true to be destructive; it only needs to be believed.” Give examples in your life when you believed something about yourself, God, or others, that was destructive even though it turned out not to be trueHow have you seen this played out either in your own life or in someone else’s? 
  5. What is “the bread” (something good) that satan uses in your life to tempt you off the path of faithfulness to Jesus?
Geek Out:

Consider: in last week’s questions we noted that in Luke’s ancestry of Jesus (chapter 2), he goes all the way back to Adam, a reminder that Jesus came for all humanity not just the Jewish people. It’s also a reminder of the reason that Jesus had to come at all — to correct the ‘sin of Adam’ — it’s an undoing of ‘the Fall.’ The temptation in the wilderness is also a correction to Israel’s failure in the wilderness (for 40 years). In other words, the life of Jesus is the undoing of the old story and the redoing of a new one! 

Act on it:

Are you convinced of your identity in Christ? That you are precious to, and loved by, God. God actually calls us “Beloved!” Meditate this week on that thought. If you need a little help with this, here are some verses that might help. 

1 John 3:2 Beloved, now we are children of God …
Romans 5:8 But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.
Colossians 3:12 Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.

These questions are connected to the message, “Is Jesus your King or your Genie?” from Sunday, June 13, 2021. You can find it here.

Dive In: Read or listen to this passage (Luke 4:14-30) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who Jesus is and what he’s like?

Reflect:

  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, and/or motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. If Jesus wanted to be with people who all thought the same way about his message, would have gone to Jerusalem. Instead, Jesus went to preach in Nazareth. What does this tell you about Jesus? What does this tell you about these two places? And how do they compare to Lakeside (or your own church community)?
  3. In what area(s) of your life has Jesus not met your expectations? Is there a miracle you were hoping for? Is it a moral issue? A global view? Some family value? Contrast that with an area of your life where Jesus has met your expectations.
  4. Marc said that we often want the benefits of the Jesus life without the cost involved. We want the blessings without the baggage. Where do you see this in your own life? Where would you rather settle for the “fringe benefits” than accept Jesus’ invitation to something? Go through the list Jesus quoted from Isaiah and discuss with others (or journal about it if you’re answering these questions alone).
  5. It looked as though the people of Nazareth only wanted Jesus to fulfill their desires and perform miracles. If you take an honest look at your own life, do you want Jesus to be your king or your genie? Will you still serve him even if you don’t get everything you want?
These questions are connected to the message, “What’s up with Jesus and Demons,” from June 20, 2021. You can watch it here.
 
Dive In: 
There is so much in this passage! Read or listen to this passage (Luke 4:31-44) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who God is?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Have you ever felt, or been made to feel, that you are unworthy of God? That God could never look favourably on you or bless you? Where did that feeling come from? 
  3. Have you before thought of the in-breaking of the Kingdom of God or of Jesus’ coming as warfare — as spiritual conflict? How does this impact the way you view the ills that plagued the world? 
  4. What do you think makes the good news of the Kingdom of God so good? 
  5. Has there been a time in your life where you’ve stepped out in faith, took a risk for God, or stood for what was right and it didn’t turn out all that well? What impact did that have on your faith? 
Act on it:
  1. What might be ways or areas where you could work towards wholeness and re-creation in your circles of influence — your relationships, neighbourhood, work environment, etc.? 
  2. This week, if you encounter discouragement or feel opposition in an area that you’re working to bring more in line with Jesus, try saying (out loud even), “Not today, Satan. Not today.” 
These questions are connected to the message, “Just because it’s a good thing doesn’t mean it’s MY thing” from Sunday, June 27, 2021. You can find it here.
 
Dive In: 
There is so much in this passage! Read or listen to this passage (Luke 4:40-5:11) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who God is?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Where has God put you?
  3. What has God given you?
  4. What is God saying to you?
These questions are connected to the message, “Finding the Wilderness in the City” from Sunday, July 4, 2021. You can watch it here.
 
Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 5:12-16) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about Jesus? What stood out that was unexpected?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon?
  2. How much time do you spend in silence and solitude?
  3. If you’d like to spend more time in solitude, how will you make that happen? What small step can you take this week to introduce silence into your life or take advantage of moments of silence that are already there? Share with a friend or your small group.
  4. Pastor and author, John Mark Comer has said, “The wilderness isn’t a place of weakness, but a place of strength.” What does this mean to you?
  5. Take a moment now to just sit in the presence of God. Don’t look at your phone, don’t run down your to-do list; just be still. How does this make you feel?

Deeper Dive:
Read one (or all) of these books.

 

These questions are connected to the message, “Making Room for Others to Meet Jesus,” from July 11, 2021. You can watch it here.
 
Dive In: This is a remarkable story on so many levels! Read or listen to this passage (Luke 5:17-28) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who God is? 
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Jeff quoted Eugene Peterson, “… religion has a long history of … reducing the huge mysteries of God to the respectability of club rules (OUCH), of shrinking the vast human community to a “membership.” But with God there are no outsiders. Jesus said, ‘the Son of man came to find and restore the lost.‘” It forces us to ask the question: Are our traditions, our practices, our service formats, our language, our music, our policies, our preaching, our programming, our beliefs, our rules obstacles to people getting to Jesus? Were any of these obstacles for you to discover Jesus? Discuss
  3. “Life change isn’t taught, it’s caught.” How might this quote impact your own spiritual journey and how you try to influence others? 
  4. Jeff: “Jesus favours the ordinary — the untitled — not the elites. I don’t know if you know this, but Jesus specializes in working with average people, with some people, with ordinary people, with good-enough people, and doesn’t that just encourage you?” How does this encourage or motivate you? Share where have you witnessed this up close and personal? 
Act on it:
Jeff emphasized the way the religious leaders and teachers just sat there, scrutinizing, criticizing, and not doing a thing to help this man get to Jesus. I wonder if this week we could reflect and pray on this and ask the Holy Spirit where this might be true in our own lives?
 
For the Geeks:
Jesus’ declaration, “Man, your sins are forgiven” would have read in the Aramaic language he spoke, “Adam your sins are forgiven.” (Adam is the Hebrew/Aramaic word for “man”)
These questions are connected to the message, “Feasting with Felons,” from July 18, 2021. You can watch it here.
 
Dive In: This story is such a moving picture of the radical love of Christ! 
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 5:27-31) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who God is? 
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Notice that one of the first things Matthew does is throw a banquet for Jesus and invite his friends. When you consider your image of Jesus, would you feel comfortable inviting Jesus to meet your friends or your friends to meet Jesus? Why or why not?
  3. It’s easy for us to marvel and be joyful at Jesus’ inclusion of the scoundrels of his day, but do we feel the same way about the worst of the worst in our society or world? It’s not difficult to think of a politician or world leader or criminal or institution that we despise. How do you feel about Jesus inviting them to follow him, to dine with him? 
  4. Is there someone in your life right now with whom you have a strained relationship because of different beliefs (e.g. political, Covid, religious, etc.)? Have you tried to reason with them and failed? Have you given up? Might you try leaning into the relationship rather than moving away from it? You could ask your group to pray for you as you attempt this. 
  5. Are there people you claim to love but wouldn’t have at your table? 

These questions are connected to the message, “Calling out Thoughtless, Habitual Religion, from July 25, 2021. You can watch it here.

Dive In: This passage hits home for most of us. Read or listen to it (Luke 5:33-39) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What did this passage teach you about who God is?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. Have you ever been hurt by Jesus-followers or the church? If you’re comfortable, share about it. Have you been able to move past it? How were you able to do that? 
  3. Is there any Christian tradition that you perhaps habitually or thoughtlessly practice without engaging with the depth and meaning of it? 
  4. What spiritual practices or traditions feed your soul or help you to encounter God? 
  5. What are some things that we have become culturally involved or enmeshed in that actually derail the way of Jesus? 

Pause & Pray

Every Wednesday, Pastor Robyn Elliott shares a short time of prayer and devotion in the weekly Pause & Pray. You can find the most recent Pause & Pray on our Facebook page or Instagram.

Groups

As we go through this series, we encourage you to find a small group of people with whom you can discuss the message. You’ll find discussion questions based on the week’s reading above. Talk about it with your small group, your friends, or your family. Need help finding a group? Click the button below to see all current groups (some are not related to the Luke series) and get connected today.

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