Lakeside Church

Luke

A series all about Jesus

Current Scripture Reading

Luke 2:21-52

Note: The audio version contains the full chapter, not just this week’s passage.

Last Week's Message

May 9, 2021

The Bible is full of stories where God shows up in ways that challenge expectations. Stories where the poor, the disadvantaged, and the social outcasts are the people who are chosen to carry his message, challenging the social norms. In this message, Pastor Marc Gagnon leads us through Luke 2:1-20 where we see the good news of Jesus’ birth brought first to some of the lowest people in society.

Discussion Questions

For small Groups, families, or for individual reflection

These questions are connected to the message, “Introducing Jesus” from April 11, 2021. You can find it here.

  1. Read the passage from two or three different translations. Are they much different? 
  2. What word, phrase, or idea grabbed you either from the passage or the sermon this week?
  3. Do you feel that you have “investigated” the beliefs that have been handed down or taught to you, or have you received them unexamined? 
  4. Does the idea of investigating truth or faith intimidate you? Why or why not?
  5. Have you experienced a time when you came into new understandings of your faith or scripture? How was that for you? 
  6. Have you ever considered that you are an eyewitness to the work of Jesus now, in your life, in the lives of others, and in the world? 
  7. In what ways have you experienced or encountered Jesus? Have you shared that with anyone? Why or why not? 

These questions are connected to the message, “What have you given up on?” from April 18, 2021. You can find it here.

  1. Read or listen to this passage (Luke 1:5-25) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before or you felt was speaking to you or that you’re challenged by?
  2. Have you found yourself in a position where the physical realities of life around you are so daunting that you forget the supernatural power of God? What can you dare to trust God for and pray into? Can you invite your group to stand with you in prayer and expectation? 
  3. Have you ever felt like you had a “constructive time-out” — a time where God was asking you to wait? To listen? What was it like? What did you learn?
  4. What have you given up on — a situation, relationship, dream? Is it a giving up out of despair or because God has called you to something else? 
  5. Have you ever been so full of church and yet empty of God? Have you found yourself so full of scripture knowledge and yet empty of encounter? If so, what ways have you found in the past that helped you encounter God (worship music, scripture, walks in nature, silent journaling)? Is it time to engage those practices again and actively seek the presence of God? 
  6. Have you ever experienced a prophetic experience like Marc shared about his calling to Lakeside or something similar? Can you share that with the group? Do you sense that perhaps you might have that spiritual gifting? 

These questions are connected to the message, “What to do when life throws you a curveball” from April 25, 2021. You can find it here.

  1. Read the passage (Luke 1:26-38) in an unfamiliar translation. What word, phrase, thought stands out to you. Why
  2. Was there a time in your life when your “preferred future” (your plans and dreams) were interrupted or dashed completely? What was that like? How did you experience God during that time (did God seem closer or more distant)? Share with the group if you’re comfortable).
  3. What is your default for handling/reacting to situations that blindside you, over which you have no control?
  4. This pandemic was unforeseen and beyond our control. Do you feel it has been a time of growth for you? Has it exposed blind spots? How has it challenged you in your faith and following of Jesus?
  5. Unlike Mary, most of our life’s curveballs aren’t direct mandates from God; they’re often the result of our own missteps, others’ missteps, or the consequences of living in a broken world. What does a faithful response look like in those situations?
  6. What might faithfulness look like for you in this season of your life? Are there areas that you feel prompted to release control over to God or to at least pray for the desire to be able to do this?
  7. What is one area of your life that you could focus on trying to be more faithful in the next few weeks? Share with your group if you’re comfortable. Do you have to see results for faithfulness to be “successful?”

These questions are connected to the message, “What is just about justice?” from May 2, 2021. You can find it here.

Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (specifically Luke 1:41-55) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before or you felt was speaking to you or challenged you?
 
Reflect:
  1. What stood out to you in the sermon? (What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, motivated you?) 
  2. How would you define or explain justice? In what ways do you think God’s justice differs from our own understanding? 
  3. Where does “punishment” fit in (or does it)? 
  4. When you think of “salvation,” what do you normally think of? Have you thought of Salvation and the Kingdom of God in terms of our current social realities, of clean water, enough food for everyone, the end of war and poverty? Why or why not? 
  5. How might considering “salvation” in this way impact how you view the gospel and the kingdom of God? 
  6. Mary declared a new Lord even though He was still in utero. In what areas do you/we need to re-evaluate our allegiance? 
  7. “It’s God’s plan therefore the method and the means must be God’s.” In what ways have you witnessed Christians or the Church (historically or currently) using the means of the world to gain and sustain influence and control? 
Geek Out: Mary references God’s promise to Abraham in Genesis 17:3-8. What is missing from Mary’s declaration that was included in the Abrahamic promise? (Hint: verse 8) Why do you suppose that is? 
 
Take Action:
Of these 5 prayers, which one might you focus on this week?  
GOD: 
  1. Where are you bigger and more outside of my/our way of thinking and interpreting the world than we are currently able to see? 
  2. What am I or we missing? What don’t we want to see?
  3. Do I prefer the security & safety of the status quo or am I willing to follow hard after faithfulness? 
  4. Am I/are we afraid of anything? If so, what and why? 
  5. God, Help me/help us to see and to imagine the impossible possibilities, God-possibilities, to welcome surprises, to expect them.
These questions are connected to the message, “Nothing good comes from ……………….!” from May 9, 2021. You can find it here.
 
Dive In:
Read or listen to this passage (Luke 2:1-20) in an unfamiliar translation of the Bible (e.g. New Living Translation or The Message). What stood out to you that you either never noticed before, or you felt was speaking to you or that you’re challenged by?
 
Reflect:
  1. What piqued your curiosity, challenged you, encouraged you, or motivated you from the sermon? 
  2. The census was an unwelcome intrusion into the lives of Mary and Joseph and the Jews of this time. Yet God used it for his purposes to fulfill an age old prophecy. Was there a time in your life when you saw God take an unwelcome, unexpected intrusion or turn of events and use it for good … redeemed it? 
  3. Bethlehem means House of Bread. Discuss the significance of this. 
  4. Luke 2:10-11 says, But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Saviour has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. What is the good news? How would you explain it to someone who asked? 
  5. God-among-us was placed in a feeding trough — the Holy amidst the ordinary, the profane. What are the implications of this for our daily lives? How might this awareness affect how we see the world, how we work, how we engage with people? 
  6. Luke 2:14 says, “Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favour rests.” The Roman Empire was an empire at peace. That peace was achieved through the pax Romana — peace born of violence, fear, and intimidation. Contrast the peace of God/peace of the Kingdom and the peace of empire. Do you think the Church today embodies the peace of God? Why or why not? How different is our worldview than that of empire? 
Geek out:

The Gospel writers didn’t record the life of Jesus like a security camera would — every event recorded in chronological order. They wrote theologically — that is, they wove the story together to make certain points and sometimes veiled allusions. Luke writes (hyperbolically) “that all the world should be registered.” Census and taxation were local affairs and conducted by local government and certainly would not have impacted “all the world.” What point or contrast might Luke be trying to make by including this phrase in the birth story of Jesus? 

Hidden Treasure:

Bethlehem was one of the towns where the lambs for sacrifice were raised. Jerusalem was  where they were slaughtered — offered for sacrifice in the temple. Jesus’ life begins in Bethlehem and ends in Jerusalem. 

Act on it:
  1. Look for God in the ordinary. Look for beauty where you might least expect it. Choose to see the image of God in someone you struggle with. 
  2. Examine your worldview. Do you find yourself considering political clout and war to “fix” world issues? 

Pause & Pray

Every Wednesday, Pastor Robyn Elliott shares a short time of prayer and devotion in the weekly Pause & Pray. You can find the most recent Pause & Pray on our Facebook page or Instagram.

Groups

As we go through this series, we encourage you to find a small group of people with whom you can discuss the message. You’ll find discussion questions based on the week’s reading above. Talk about it with your small group, your friends, or your family. Need help finding a group? Click the button below to see all current groups (some are not related to the Luke series) or keep scrolling to see current groups based on this series.

A Deeper Dive

Following Jesus: it’s what each of us here at Lakeside long to do. Join us each week as we dive deeper into the sermon on Luke and the passage that was covered that Sunday — asking questions and reflecting on the implications for our lives and our following of Jesus. 

This group runs on Zoom, Wednesdays from 7-8:30pm until May 26.

Marco Polo Groups for Men

If you want to connect with other men at Lakeside but can’t fit another Zoom meeting into your schedule or due to your schedule/lifestyle, you find it difficult to commit to a set day/time each week, this just might be the type of group for you.

Marco Polo groups are small groups of 3-5 people who meet weekly (but not on a set day or at a set time) through short, private video messages on the (free) Marco Polo app.

Marco Polo Groups for Women

If you want to connect with other women at Lakeside but can’t fit another Zoom meeting into your schedule or due to your schedule/lifestyle, you find it difficult to commit to a set day/time each week, this just might be the type of group for you.

Marco Polo groups are small groups of 3-5 people who meet weekly (but not on a set day or at a set time) through short, private video messages on the (free) Marco Polo app.

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